Bonus Scenes...those little extras...

I love reading bonus scenes or watching bonus clips on television. If someone told me I could read about or watch Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet get married, I would be beyond excited. Imagination is great, but there are times when I don’t want to imagine or guess—I want to know! I even want to know when storylines change and what might have been… That’s why I created these bonus scenes and extras from several of the A Family Affair books. 

  • Wouldn’t you like to know what Nate Desantro was thinking right before he married Christine?
  • And how about discovering Harry Blacksworth’s thoughts as he prepares to give Christine away?
  • Lily is still one of my favorites and she’ll warm your heart with her innocent and yet spot-on observations about the wedding, life, and love in Magdalena. Don’t miss these and more in this collection of bonus scenes from various A Family Affair books.

I loved writing these scenes and now I want to share them with you. Enjoy!

A Family Affair: Bonus Scenes

Fourteen Months of Patience

Hello from Ohio:

As many of you know, I’m an avid gardener and love spending time with my perennial flowers. It’s truly relaxing and when I’m digging in the dirt, it’s one of the best ways for me to think about my stories. I love a good plant “challenge” and I’ve encountered several over the years, but the biggest one was from “the orchid.” For years, I limited my indoor flowers to African violets and Christmas cacti. (I’m talking eight or ten violets at any time, and the same amount for the cacti.) Do they bloom? Of course. They’re beautiful. I understand exactly what they need and I’m vigilant.

And then I decided to try an orchid. I bought one, brought it home and admired the delicate beauty. It lasted all of three weeks, before, one by one, the flowers shriveled and died. Apparently, I gave it too much attention. Too much attention? I’m a nurturer—there is no such thing as too much attention. I asked for another orchid for Christmas. I got three. Oh, they lived a while, but then the flowers died off, too, leaving me with sticks. I almost threw them out because I was disgusted, but friends gave me advice. Leave it alone. Don’t give it too much attention. Don’t water too much. Be patient. I took my inability to make the darn thing bloom personally. But I listened to the advice and moved the “sticks” to an empty bedroom and left them alone. I visited once a week, watered…waited. Fourteen months later and ta-da! I’ve got a bloom. The other orchid is full of buds! Patience and persistence, the mantra I use in writing seems to work with orchid growing, too!

 

Emotion IS the Story

When my father spoke in a stern voice, which was most of the time, I cried. When my brothers tormented me, along came the tears. As time and years passed, I cried at heart-tugging books, movies, or real-life situations. I was a regular dripping faucet, and it was a problem!

It would take practice and much self-talk to control the tears, but I did it. I even learned to internalize the sad stories I read or heard about, and felt so deeply, I would ponder the story or situation at great length. What must it feel like to experience the following; a sick child, a cheating husband, a dying parent… As I wrote, these emotions breathed life into my characters, and became their emotions. Eventually, I learned to blend humor into the stories.

I still cry when I read, watch, or hear about a sad tale, but when I’m creating my own work, I give those characters humor to lighten the load of humanness that cloaks them.

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